March 9, 2016 Every once in a while I would see a post on Facebook about a bird needing help. A common reply to these posts was, "C...

Rogue Rehab - An Introduction

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March 9, 2016

Every once in a while I would see a post on Facebook about a bird needing help. A common reply to these posts was, "Contact Tim Jasinski!" I was curious who Tim was, where he works, what he does there, and what happens to the birds he treats. We are proud to announce the start of a new series on the Rogue Birder blog - Rogue Rehab, featuring Tim Jasinski!!!
Rogue Rehab - An Introduction
by Chris Collins

Late last year I contacted Tim Jasinski to ask for updates on an odd Great Horned Owl that seemed to be in trouble in Huron, Ohio. There didn't seem to be an easy way to check on the birds that we all care so much about. I mentioned to Tim that we could use the Rogue Birder blog to share the stories of these birds, the issues they experience, and the wonderful people that take such good care of them.

This post is where it all begins. Welcome to Rogue Rehab!

Tim's fascination with birds began early in life. A self-proclaimed "bird nerd" at the age of 5, and by the age of 8 was nursing sick or injured birds back to health and releasing them. At 13 Tim began breeding and raising caged birds. Later in life he became friends with a rehabber and this rekindled his passion for rehab.
"My passion for wildlife rehabilitation is crazy..."
Transporting injured birds to places like the Medina Raptor Center provided Tim with the opportunity to network with other rehabbers. In July of 2006 he brought a window-strike Hairy Woodpecker to the Lake Erie Nature & Science Center and just had to figure out how to work there. Tim started as a volunteer in 2007 and became a seasonal Wildlife Rehabilitation Specialist in 2010 and again in 2011. He was hired full time in the spring of 2013.

Tim told me, "My passion for wildlife rehabilitation is crazy, and my favorite species to work on are waterfowl, gulls and songbirds." The Lake Erie Nature and Science Center specializes in waterfowl rehabilitation.

Tim recently took part in the the banding of a few birds that have been, or will soon be released. He said, "Banding rehab birds is so important! You never know when one will show up, but if they ever do, you can learn from that case. When we release OVER 100 hand-raised Mallards each year, and not one is found chasing people around, we did our job correctly." The center has had many returns on gulls, geese and ducks that they would have never known about if the birds were not banded. Less than 1% of songbirds are ever found and reported but waterfowl is more like 15-19 %, because of hunter harvested birds.
"Banding rehab birds is so important! You never know when one will show up, but if they ever do, you can learn from that case"
I am hoping that this series can become a place to provide updated information on the birds that are rescued and rehabilitated at the centers that Tim works with. As well as the stories of the amazing people that perform this incredible work.

If you find a sick, injured or orphaned wildlife, please contact the center at 1-440-471-8357.

And now a few items from Tim...


Here are some photos of a 5th year male Bald Eagle (BAEA) that was taken to Ohio Bird Sanctuary last fall with a severe leg fracture. It has had surgery by their vet and it was repaired and healed. The bird was released on Monday near where it was originally found. These photos show it being banded by a master bander. He had to measure the halux to identify this bird as a male, along with bill measurements. He put the colored band on - these are field readable and any bird band seen out birding should be reported! The silver band is the USGS band. Here you can see both bands, the field readable band says 01/A.

A Red-tailed Hawk (RTHA), a Red-shouldered Hawk (RSHA), and a Barred Owl (BDOW) that were just thin and needing some fattening up. Following their time at the Ohio Bird Sanctuary, they will be released this week!

This after 4th year male Herring Gull (HERG) was brought to he Lake Erie Nature and Science Center from Lake County, OH with lame legs, where it was very weak and couldn’t stand. After about two weeks of cage rest and meds, he started standing! He was then put into a smaller flight cage for a week and then into and outdoor flight cage with our huge new 7’x7’ pond! He was walking well, perching and flying. He was released on Tuesday!

Finally, here are a few photos of two Ruby-throated Hummingbird (RTHU) chicks that we hand-raised at he Lake Erie Nature and Science Center last year, as orphans. You can see the TINY band on the bird's leg after we released them!

Post-release - See the tiny little band?
CONTACT INFORMATION
Lake Erie Nature & Science Centers's Wildlife Rehabilitation program is free to the public. They are open 7 days a week except for major holidays. They care for about 1200 sick, injured and orphaned wildlife animals each year.

If someone finds a sick, injured or orphaned wildlife, please contact the center at 1-440-471-8357.



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